Latest Research

Truly Grimm Tales

“Fairy tales since the beginning of recorded time, and perhaps earlier, have been a means to conquer the terrors of mankind through metaphor.” –  Jack Zipes   In 1812, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published the first edition of Kinder-und-Hausmarchen, a...

A Saloon without the Liquor: Coffee Houses in the 19th Century

“I have measured out my life with coffee spoons” –  T.S. Eliot   The delicious, rich taste of coffee. Today, coffee houses are commonly employed for various purposes: a meeting place, study session, or a chance to escape the realities and duties from...

Arlington: An American Monument of Irony

Situated majestically across the Potomac River basin, Arlington National Cemetery is arguably the most hallowed grounds in the United States, holding the graves of two U.S. Presidents, members of Congress, Supreme Court Justices, and thousands of veterans from every...

The American Ebola Outbreak

Ebola is one of the most deadly viruses ever discovered – a hemorrhagic virus that can cause lethal organ failures in seven to 16 days after infection. The recent outbreak of Ebola Zaire in 2014  in West Africa was the largest in recorded history. By September...

The Fall and Rise of Algernon Graves

The most carefully indexed record of British art exhibitions in the 19th Century was the result of a decidedly unartful fall. A Londoner carrying bottles of wine for his uncle slipped on some ice barely half a mile from home, employing his corporeal frame to protect...

Niles’ Weekly Register

The Weekly Register (1811-1849) was valued in its own time for offering unbiased national and international reporting, including weekly accounts of politics, society, agriculture, science, and more. Even at the time these articles were published, people understood the...

The Observations of Senator William Maclay, 1789-1791

“(Jefferson) had a rambling, vacant look and nothing of that firm, collected deportment which I expected.” Between 1789-1791, Senator William Maclay of Pennsylvania penned his first-person views of the day-by-day happenings of the First Senate of the...

The Politics of Art: The 19th Century Arts and Crafts Movement

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, life underwent a considerable change for much of the British population. The industrial revolution completely shifted how people understood work and the opportunities available to them. The economic implications of...

Art and the Suffrage Movement

“Women who sought the vote were invariably portrayed as unnatural and unwomanly, and often viciously caricatured as grotesque and hysterical”   The debate over women’s suffrage in turn-of-the-century Britain was not just a war of words, but a war of...

Did Benjamin Franklin Invent the Insurance Industry?

With great wealth comes great risk. The more you have of value, the more you have to lose. Humans have long tried to find ways to reduce the risk of losing valuable investments. Going at least as far back as the Code of Hammurabi from 1750 B.C., people have been...

Exploring the World of Government Documents

Government Documents 101 Part I. What, Who and Why The average researcher likely doesn’t think often about government documents. Unless your specialty is political science, law or government history, government documents don’t seem like an obvious resource to utilize....

Preserving Jeremy Bentham

You might know Jeremy Bentham as the father of Utilitarianism—once the dominant moral and political view of the Western world. Perhaps you know him as the mentor to John Stuart Mill, himself a proponent of women’s suffrage. You might not be familiar, however, with the...

David Hume: Publish or Perish

Think you’re having a hard time getting published? Then you and David Hume have something in common. The 18th century Scottish literatus, who is arguably the greatest English-language philosopher to have ever lived, struggled to have his magnum opus, A Treatise of...

The Birth Of America’s National Parks

In 1872, out of a desire to preserve the area’s beauty for future generations, the United States Congress created the first national park, Yellowstone. The creation of the park itself didn’t immediately inspire the kind of respect and preservation we...

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